Attractions and Things to do in Washington, D.C.

Things to Do

The historic capital of the United States is an urban hub of sights and attractions. While the White House may be the most well-known destination, there’s a lot more to Washington, D.C. than the president’s playground. From delicious restaurants to lively concerts, you’ll never run out of things to do, see and explore in this historic city. Make the most of your getaway while staying in budget with our exclusive Washington, D.C. vacation packages.

Monuments

Monuments


In the heart of iconic National Mall towers the Washington Monument, a 555-foot marble obelisk. The tallest stone structure in the world and the tallest building in the city, the monument was built to commemorate George Washington, the first President of the United States. Though construction began in 1848, lack of funds and the Civil War interrupted the work from 1854 to 1877. When construction finally resumed, a different quarry was used as the source of marble, creating a change in color about a third of the way up the monument.
Music

Music


While Ford’s Theatre, the sight of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, still puts on musicals to this day, it’s not the only venue in which you can catch a concert or show. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts features performances by the National Symphony Orchestra as well as the Washington Opera. For a more up-tempo experience, take a trip to 9:30 Club. Having made a name for itself over the past 36 years hosting premier artists and a wide range of distinguished musical guests, the standing-room only venue has a 1,200-person capacity for an intimate, personal experience.
Museums

Museums


Love space ships? Art exhibits? What about American history? Whatever topic peaks your interest, the Smithsonian Institution most likely has a museum dedicated to it. Boasting 11 museums and galleries on the National Mall, as well as six other museums and the National Zoo in the greater D.C. area, the institute is known as the world’s largest museum, education and research complex. Don’t worry about bringing your wallet, admission is completely free! And rest assured Ben Stiller fans, the exhibits don’t come alive at night…at least that we know of.
Munchies

Munchies


The capital of the United States is known as a melting pot of cultures, and its dining certainly reflects that. From Mediterranean cuisine to seafood specialties, there are plenty of choices to choose from. Some of our favorite restaurants include Hill Country Barbecue and Market, home to Texas-style BBQ and their famous mac-and-cheese, as well as Daikaya-Izakaya, a prime stop for Japanese small plates. After a satisfying meal, you’ve got to check out The Dignitary, a modern whiskey bar with handcrafted cocktails and over 40 whiskeys to choose from. With beverages named after U.S. Presidents, it’s the perfect place to get a taste of D.C.’s culture.
Memorials

Memorials


All things considered, you probably came to D.C. to see the memorials. These unique attractions embody the spirit of the nation’s capital, and honor those that served and fought for their country in times of need. The World War II, Vietnam Veterans and Korean War Veterans Memorials remind citizens of the sacrifices members of the military have made, and are revered by millions of visitors each year. Not all of D.C.’s memorials are dedicated to groups of men and women, however. The Lincoln Memorial was built to commemorate the nation’s 16th president and is a symbol of unity, strength and wisdom. The neo-classical building is arguably the most emblematic of D.C.’s sights.

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Washington DC Quick Facts

When the Washington Monument opened in 1884, it was the tallest structure in the world until the Eiffel Tower was built in 1889.

George Washington never lived in D.C. The White House was completed one year after his death.

There is an empty crypt underneath the Capitol Building where President Washington was supposed to be buried, but he wanted to be buried at his home, Mount Vernon, instead.  

Washington, D.C. residents could not vote for the President until 1961.

Per capita, D.C. residents drink more wine than residents in any of the 50 states.

Climate

Windy year-round, Washington, D.C. has warm, muggy summers that typically last from the end of May to mid-September with average daily highs of 79°F and average lows around 63°F. From December to March, temperatures vary from highs around 50°F and lows around 30°F.

While fall and spring are lovely with temperatures averaging around 67°F, spring is the only season in which you can catch the area’s famous cherry blossoms reaching full bloom. The flowers’ growth greatly benefits from the city’s 3-4 inches of precipitation each month. In fact, D.C. gets approximately 43.5 inches of rain a year, which is more than Seattle! Whether you’re touring the city in sunshine or rain, you’re bound to have a memorable adventure.