Things To Do in Puerto Rico

Things to Do

From our last installment of “things to do in Puerto Rico,” it’s easy to see how incredibly diverse Puerto Rico is. For further fun and even more things to do in the area, we’ve complied additional activities for your enjoyment. Pack your bag and get ready to map out all of the possibilities ahead!

Go Deep-Sea Diving

Go Deep-Sea Diving


Majestic underground canyons, caves and arches that are calling your name lie 13 miles west of Puerto Rico in the middle of the ocean. Explore the underwater playground of Las Cuevas of Desecheo, known as the Galapagos of the Caribbean beside various species of aquatic wildlife and even Rhesus monkeys that have overpopulated the area since their drop off in the 1960s. But, the wildlife-dense interior is off limits due to the military having used it as a training ground long ago.
Push it to the Limits

Push it to the Limits


Each year, athletic junkies gather in east-central Puerto Rico’s Cerro de Nandy in San Lorenzo for a mega-challenging race called Hell Mile. The event, put on by Exxtremixta Adventure Races in the sweltering July heat, is composed of rounds. In the first round, you do a 1-mile trip up and down the mountain. In the second round, you do the same but with a weighted bag (15 pounds for women and 25 pounds for men). For the third round, even more weight is used (25 pounds for the women and 50 pounds for the men).
Bicycling Tours

Bicycling Tours


What better way to see the 375 miles of Puerto Rico’s sandy coast than on a bike? La Vuelta will take you and hundreds of others the entire way around the island in three exciting days in late January when the temperatures are nearly perfect. While it’s considered a race, many partake just for the scenery.
Birdwatch in Guanica State Forest

Birdwatch in Guanica State Forest


Take a worthwhile trip to Southwest Puerto Rico to the most well-known dry forest in the Caribbean, Guanica State Forest. Designated a Biosphere Reserve by the U.N. in 1981, the more than 36 lush miles of vegetation provides plenty to see even though it is a dry forest — meaning it gets less than 30 inches of rain per year. Keep your eyes peeled for more than 50 percent of Puerto Rico’s terrestrial species as well as 700 plant species, 48 of them endangered. Bring your cameras and watch your step.
Enjoy the Outdoors Even More

Enjoy the Outdoors Even More


Spend an entire day (or more) exploring the eco-adventure park known as Toro Verde. You’ve guessed by now that Puerto Rico is richly dense in vegetation, wildlife and waterfalls, but why just see it from a distance? Become one with nature by flying through the jungle on zip lines and seeing up close and personal the species that inhabit the area. It might also feel good to get a little wet rappelling down the waterfalls. Best of all, these activities are within an hour’s drive of Puerto Rico.

More information

Puerto Rico Quick Facts

There is more than enough sand and ocean for everyone in Puerto Rico, with the country boasting 270 miles of beaches.

Puerto Rico is home to the world’s largest telescope called the Arecibo Observatory. It is used to look at asteroids in space, and determine if any ever get too close to the Earth’s surface.

Spanglish is commonly heard throughout Puerto Rico, due to the influence of the English language.

Puerto Rico is home to the Pina Colada and rum is the libation of choice for locals. With major distilleries such as Bacardi residing on the island, 70% of the rum sold in the U.S. comes from Puerto Rico. 

Climate

Daytime temperatures in Puerto Rico stay in a relatively tight (and warm) range, with highs hitting the upper 70s to upper 80s (Fahrenheit).  The winter months are considered peak season for visitors, with temps usually in the 80-degree range. Spring is pleasant, summer tends to be a little hotter and rainier, and the fall months from October to mid-December are ideal.  Low temperatures on the island don’t usually drop below 70 degrees (Fahrenheit), meaning that packing for a winter trip to Puerto Rico does not require much more than a light jacket or sweater.