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Atlantis, Paradise Island: A Truly Unique Destination

Atlantis Paradise Island Resort offers an unforgettable vacation for all ages! Choose from five unique properties and start planning an amazing vacation to The Bahamas. From the Royal Casino, to the white sand beaches, to the marine exhibits, the golf course and over a dozen pools, there's something for everyone on Paradise Island.

And remember, Vacations by Marriott is the only place you can book a complete vacation with airfare and earn Marriott Rewards® points!

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Australia Vacation Packages | Vacations by Marriott | Australia Vacation Deals Quick Facts

Ashmore and Cartier Islands
Australian Antarctic Territory
Christmas Island
Cocos (Keeling) Islands
Coral Sea Islands
Heard Island and McDonald Islands

Climate

Australia's landmass of 7,617,930 square kilometres (2,941,300 sq mi)[120] is on the Indo-Australian Plate. Surrounded by the Indian and Pacific oceans,[N 5] it is separated from Asia by the Arafura and Timor seas, with the Coral Sea lying off the Queensland coast, and the Tasman Sea lying between Australia and New Zealand. The world's smallest continent[122] and sixth largest country by total area,[123] Australia—owing to its size and isolation—is often dubbed the "island continent",[124] and is sometimes considered the world's largest island.[125] Australia has 34,218 kilometres (21,262 mi) of coastline (excluding all offshore islands),[126] and claims an extensive Exclusive Economic Zone of 8,148,250 square kilometres (3,146,060 sq mi). This exclusive economic zone does not include the Australian Antarctic Territory.[127] Apart from Macquarie Island, Australia lies between latitudes 9° and 44°S, and longitudes 112° and 154°E.
 
The Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest coral reef,[128] lies a short distance off the north-east coast and extends for over 2,000 kilometres (1,240 mi). Mount Augustus, claimed to be the world's largest monolith,[129] is located in Western Australia. At 2,228 metres (7,310 ft), Mount Kosciuszko on the Great Dividing Range is the highest mountain on the Australian mainland. Even taller are Mawson Peak (at 2,745 metres or 9,006 feet), on the remote Australian territory of Heard Island, and, in the Australian Antarctic Territory, Mount McClintock and Mount Menzies, at 3,492 metres (11,457 ft) and 3,355 metres (11,007 ft) respectively.[130]