Things to do in Nashville

Things to Do

The largest city and capital of Tennessee, Nashville is known as the cornerstone of the country music industry. But music is only part of the city’s playlist. Deemed the “Athens of the South” as early as the 1850’s, Nashville has plenty of things to do – from visiting historic sites to world-class museums. Take advantage of our exclusive vacation packages and discover the sights and sounds of Music City for yourself, all while staying within your budget.

Pinnacle Performances

Pinnacle Performances


Arguably Tennessee’s most famous attraction, the Grand Ole Opry began as a radio broadcast in 1925 and has since evolved into a live music phenomenon. The mecca of country music, the Opry is where thousands travel to each year to experience a show at America’s most famous stage. While Ryman Auditorium housed the Opry from 1943-1974, the Grand Ole Opry House is where you can currently catch lineups consisting of a range of artists, from up-and-comers to established superstars like Carrie Underwood and Garth Brooks.
Hot and Spicy

Hot and Spicy


While many have tried to imitate the signature flavors of the metropolis, Nashville is the only place you can enjoy the real taste of hot chicken. Heavily breaded and coated in cayenne, the city’s fiery specialty is traditionally served on white bread and topped with pickles. For the most authentic experiences – not to mention the most alluring flavors – we recommend Hattie B’s Hot Chicken and Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack, though the dish is widely served throughout the city, as well.
Honky Tonk Highway

Honky Tonk Highway


Marked by neon signs and the constant presence of country, blues and rock ‘n’ roll music, Nashville’s Honky Tonk Highway on Lower Broadway is one of the most emblematic of Music City’s attractions. Open from 10 a.m. to 3 a.m. every day, the two-block strip of bars and music venues attracts both tourists and locals alike. Whether you’re riding the mechanical bull at Tequila Cowboy or listening to one of the three bands at Tootsies Orchid Lounge, you’re bound to have a boot scootin’ good time. Many stars have gotten their start in the spirited neighborhood, so keep your eyes peeled – you never know who you’re going to run into.
Museums

Museums


See a vibrant display of Southern culture when you explore the many museums near downtown. For history buffs, Nashville offers The Hermitage, President Andrew Jackson’s home. The tranquil plantation features an on-site museum that is fantastic for guests of all ages to learn about “the people’s president.” If you want to stick to Nashville’s music theme during your trip, we recommend the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. There, you can discover the immense collection of records, artifacts, videos, instruments, photographs and interactive touch-screens that document the lives of some of country music’s most famous musicians including Hank Williams and Johnny Cash.
Athens of the South

Athens of the South


When you’re looking to escape the urban hustle and bustle, take a stroll through charming Centennial Park. Occupying 132 acres, the park boasts a beautiful multi-purpose trail around Lake Watauga and a dog park. The most distinguished sight at the park is easily The Parthenon. The full-scale replica of the famous Greek temple was originally built to be a temporary attraction in 1897, however, the neoclassical building was saved by its popularity and the high-costs of demolition. Nowadays, the neoclassical building serves as an art museum and features a replica of the Athena Parthenos statue, a landmark of the original Parthenon in Athens.

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Nashville Quick Facts

Nashville was the first city in the United States to be granted a FM-broadcasting license in 1941.

The windows of the Country Music Hall of Fame were designed to look like the keys on a piano.

Nashville native William Walker became president of Nicaragua in 1856. No American has become president of another country since then.

Fort Nashborough, the foundation for the rest of city, was established on Christmas Eve 1977.

Completed in 1859, the State Capitol Building is still in use to this day.

Climate

Like most areas in the South, Nashville has long, hot summers and short, mild winters. Though highs average in the low 70s in months such as April and October, the temperature can reach as high as the low 90s by midsummer. While warm climate is usually a given, come to Nashville prepared. The heat and rapidly changing weather can create sporadic thunderstorms from late spring to early fall.

From November to March, the temperatures tend to range from the upper 20s to 40s, though the city only gets about 10 inches of snow annually. Despite it being a little chilly outside, the hot food and hotter concerts are bound to warm you up in a hurry.