Four Days of Southern Charm in Savannah

posted on Wednesday, January 27, 2016 at 12:56:17 PM

Tantalize your taste buds with fresh seafood on Savannah’s historic waterfront, stroll along the streets where Colonial and Medieval architecture take you back to the 18th and 19th centuries and learn about the city’s haunted history in attractions including Chippewa Square and Wright Square. Take a look at our Savannah Georgia vacation packages and enjoy four days of southern charm in Savannah.

Day One: It is early afternoon when you land at Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport. You collect your luggage and take a quick, 15-minute ride into Savannah and the Savannah Marriott Riverfront. Conveniently located on the city’s historic waterfront, the hotel is connected to the world-famous River Street - Savannah's most visited attraction - via the Riverwalk. You check in, then take a stroll through the area to explore the unique downtown district and its beautiful squares, historic house museums, art galleries, and quaint antique shops. Soon enough it’s time for dinner at Vic’s on the River, where after an appetizer of Crawfish Beignets with Tabasco syrup, you’re treated to a Southern Seafood Bouillabaisse entrée of scallops, shrimp, clams, mussels and more. The setting dates back to 1858, and you soak in the historic ambiance as you enjoy the meal and get ready for more exploration in the days to come.

Day Two: You’ve set aside your first full day in Savannah to really get to know the city, and have planned both a hop-on, hop-off trolley tour and a river cruise. You begin with a ride through Savannah and learn a little about the city's history, heritage, culture and architecture from a friendly guide. You loop through the Historic District, check out the Victorian District, browse the Savannah City Market and eventually make your way to River Street, where you board the Savannah River Queen and cruise along the lovely Savannah River while enjoying the sights from a somewhat different perspective. Eventually, you’ve moved around enough to get a bit hungry, so you grab a late lunch at Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room, then turn the corner and visit ShopSCAD, which supports students and faculty from the Savannah College of Art and Design and features original fine art, décor, jewelry, fashion and gifts. Lots of fun today, with more on the way.

Day Three: Today you leave your room with an appetite, as you plan to feast on Savannah's cuisine as part of a foodie tour that stops at no less than six of the city's much-loved local eateries. You sample dishes that have formed the backbone of Georgian cuisine, including succulent southern BBQ, soul food, fried green tomatoes, Georgian peach tea and good old, home-style comfort food. The samples are amazing, and you’re quickly developing both an appreciation for Southern cooking and some concern for your waistline! Later, as darkness falls, you join local psychic "Scott the See'r" on a journey to discover Savannah’s haunted history. Destinations include Chippewa Square (where the bench scene from the movie ‘Forest Gump’ was filmed), Colonial Park Cemetery and the famous Wright Square, better known as 'hanging square' to Georgia’s original colonists. You also learn about the legends and hauntings at the Savannah Theatre, the Sorrell Weed House, the Mercer House, 432 Abercorn and the Epsy house. Intriguing stuff – a little scary, but intriguing.

Day Four: You’ll be leaving Savannah this evening, but have a few more stops to make before heading back to the airport for your flight home. There are literally hundreds of architecturally-significant buildings in this city! Most of the prevailing architectural styles America's 18th and 19th century can be found in Savannah, from simple Colonial style to Medieval-influenced cathedrals, to the gingerbread accents of the Victorian period. In the 1700s, General James Oglethorpe had a utopian vision for the city – a plan that’s still reflected today. Your stops include Christ Church (1840), Pink House (1771), Kehoe House (1892), Owens Thomas House (1816), and Davenport House (1820). In stark contrast to much of the modern architecture of today, magnificent ironwork is everywhere, with beautiful scrolled designs appearing on many of the buildings in cast-iron balconies, stair railings and window guards. It’s a nice way to end your visit to Savannah, truly one of the American South’s finest jewels.

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